DIY Electric Brew in a Bag Part List

Controller

ComponentLinkPrice($)
Main Power breaker switchAuber8.99
Pump LED push buttonAuber11.98
Element LED push buttonAuber11.98
Element button 10A extensionAuber7.65
SSRAuber9.95
Temperature controllerAuber46.95
Temperature probe with wires and connectorsAuber44.99
Pump outletAuber1.95
Power inletAuber2.30
Element outletAuber2.50
Enclosure+HeatsinkAuber79.00
Fuses and HoldersAmazon9.99
Wire splices (20A rated)Amazon9.45
Wire ConnectorsAmazon16.99
Wiring 12 gaugeAmazon12.98
Wiring 16 gaugeAmazon9.98
TOTAL287.63

Brew Pot

ComponentLinkPrice($)
PotAmazon
Bed Bath & Beyond
83.99
Bulkhead with mini dip tubeBrewHardware19.00
Ball valve (whirlpool port)Amazon15.99
Ball valve (drain)BrewHardware17.99
1/2″ NPT ElbowBrewHardware3.50
Triclamp BulkheadAmazon
BrewHardware
20.99
Sigth glassBrewHardware28.00
1/2″ NPT Tee x 2BrewHardware8.00
1/2′ NTP BulkheadAmazon4.00
1/2″ NPT Hose barbcame with ball valve0.00
1/2″ Male Quick DisconnectBrewHardware5.99
Blichmann autospargeBlichmann69.95
Total261.40

Element

ComponentLinkPrice
2250W ElementBrewhardware62.99
O-ringBrewhardware2.00
ClampBrewhardware7.00
Total71.99

Recirculation

ComponentLinkPrice
pumpAmazon25.50
valveBrewhardware12.99
bulkheadAmazon 10.99
nozzle (3/8 NPT)Amazon 3.66
hosingAmazon 28.69
Total81.83

Ball lock fittings

ComponentLinkPrice($)
Type F/C pair (3) Amazon41.97
Type A/C pair (1) Amazon13.59
Total53.96

Camlock fittings

ComponentLinkPrice($)
type F (3)Brewhardware12.00
type A (1)Brewhardware4.00
type C (4)Brewhardware30.00
Total46.00

Cables

ComponentLinkPrice($)
CableAmazon 10.27
NEMA L6-30 Female plugAmazon9.79
NEMA 5-20 male plugAmazon 8.99
Total29.75

Total

Controller$287.63
Brewpot$261.40
Element$71.99
Recirculation (ball lock)$53.96+81.83
Cables$29.75
Total Parts786.56

Tools

ToolLinkPrice($)
Ratcheting crimp toolAmazon21.26
Wire stripperAmazon7.99
1/2″ drill bitAmazon7.29
Jig SawAmazon40.30
Total76.84
ToolLinkprice($)
40 mm hole sawAmazon12.59
21 mm hole sawAmazon19.96
OR step bitAmazon14.97
 Total (hole saws only)  32.55

4 thoughts on “DIY Electric Brew in a Bag Part List

  1. Awesome build!
    Looking at doing something similar, but the diy controller seems expensive compared to an off the shelf unit like the ink bird 16s.
    If you were doing this build again, would you be tempted to use a unit like that, or does the approach here have other advantages (beyond the fun of rolling your own)?

    1. Thanks for your comment! Interestingly, i had not come across this controller when doing research. It seems like a pretty good unit for the price. Short Circuited Brewers did a review on it here. I think the main reason this would not have worked for me, is that it’s a 15Amp unit. It can thus only power a 1650W element at most, which will work for 5G batches but will be very slow (see more details in this post). My built is 20Amps and can deliver 2250W of heat. I would consider this the minimum practical power output for 5 Gallon batches at 120V. Beyond that you have to move to the 240V “dryer outlet”.

      1. Interesting- yes the 15A/120V limitation does seem to be an issue. The build I’ve been thinking about uses dual 15A heaters, so the custom controller approach would let me run both of those in a PID loop (I would need a second SSR). On the other hand, I assume the extra wattage is most important when going to full boil and holding it. I wonder if a single element under PID control would be adequate, with the second heater wired to an on/off switch? Do you regulate temperature during the boil, or just set a heater power (open loop)?

        1. Correct, extra power is most important when ramping to boil after the mash. Your 2 heater idea would probably work, at least conceptually. I am not sure if there would be an issue in having a heater that is always one for the entire period of the boil. I’ve done this on my first batch, and got burnt beer that went down the toilet. There could have been other reasons for this, but i am weary of having a heater 100% on during the whole boil. I typically boil at ~85% power and leave the pot 3/4 covered.

          There is no sense in having a closed loop boil, as the temperature does not change with more heat. Boiling water will be 100C no matter how much heat goes in. The difference will be in the rate of evaporation rather than in a rise of temperature. A close loop system would have to measure the rate of evaporation rather than the temperature, during the boil.

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